Learned Intermediary

This is a quick-hit post bringing you two first-of-their-kind orders on proving causation in cases alleging inadequate drug or medical device warnings.  In orders applying Georgia’s and Delaware’s versions of the learned intermediary doctrine, two different federal courts have held that a plaintiff alleging inadequate warnings cannot meet his or her burden of proving causation

Mention the Third Restatement of Torts and the learned intermediary rule in the same sentence, and our response would be to cite §6(d) of the product liability part of the Restatement.  But the Third Restatement also confirms that this widely followed (perhaps the most widely followed) legal rule also applies to negligence causes of

Patchwork is a type of needlework that involves sewing together pieces of fabric into a larger design, usually based on some repeating pattern.  The fabric pieces can be different shapes and different colors that are then pieced together.  Evidence of patchwork was found in Egyptian tombs.  We tend to think of it more in terms

We usually represent manufacturers, not pharmacies, in personal injury cases, so why should we care whether pharmacies can be on the hook? Well, if the pharmacy’s presence in the case prevents federal diversity jurisdiction, then solid case law shielding the pharmacy from liability will be crucial to our argument that the pharmacy was fraudulently/improperly joined.

When we discuss the learned intermediary rule, it is typically in the context of protecting our drug and device manufacturer clients. If a manufacturer warned the doctor, it discharged its duties, and a plaintiff should not be able to claim that he or she was not directly warned. We do not often represent pharmacies, but

Sort of like hail in Alabama.  It happens, but when it does it’s an event.  Not like say picking a perfect NCAA March Madness bracket (1 in 2.4 trillion).  Maybe more like the chance of getting struck by lightning in a lifetime (1 in 13,000).  In any case, a California trial court decision finding no

Manufacturers supervising medical doctors?  In two words, they don’t.  Yet plaintiffs, particularly in cases where preemption forecloses more normal product liability claims, try to get courts to impose such duties.  We took a look at that issue back during the early days of the blog, when it was still a Bexis/Herrmann operation, in our September

Somebody asked Bexis the other day whether he thought that the increasing reliance on “telemedicine” – physician consultations taking place online, perhaps followed by the prescription of a drug or medical device – posed any risks to the learned intermediary rule.

Bexis said, “no.”  Would you expect other answer?

That response was based largely on

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. A jack of all trades is a master of none. These cutesy little phrases throw some derision toward one who possesses some knowledge in a bunch of areas. Representing drug and device companies in litigation can make a lawyer reject the negative interpretation of these phrases. We have