Design Defect

Last week with dismay, we described the Eastern District of Pennsylvania’s decision in Gross v. Coloplast Corp., et al., 黑龙江福彩网app官方下载 WL 264691 (E.D. Pa. Jan. 17, 黑龙江福彩网app官方下载).   The Gross court (we are resisting the immature cheap shot) “predicted,” in the face of decades of contrary evidence, that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court would not extend

We would be remiss (and out of character) if we plunged into a discussion of today’s case without a shout-out to “Siba,” the gorgeous black Standard Poodle who won Best in Show at last week’s Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Regular readers of this blog may recall that we attend Westminster every year and that

Patchwork is a type of needlework that involves sewing together pieces of fabric into a larger design, usually based on some repeating pattern.  The fabric pieces can be different shapes and different colors that are then pieced together.  Evidence of patchwork was found in Egyptian tombs.  We tend to think of it more in terms

The opinion, Schrecengost v. Coloplast Corp., 2019 WL 6465398 (W.D. Pa. Dec. 2, 2019), recently “predicted” that Pennsylvania would allow strict liability design and warning defect claims in cases involving prescription medical products.  Id. at *11-13.  In so doing Schrecengost was not only wrong, but loud wrong.  First, without even a serious discussion, Schrecengost

More than ten years since the Supreme Court wrote Twombly and Iqbal, the power of those two decisions remains strong enough to roll over almost any claims that dare to show up without supporting facts. The plaintiff in Shapiro v. NuVasive, Inc., 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 191373, at *4-5 (S.D. Fla. Nov. 5,

A couple of weeks ago we compared New Jersey litigation with New Jersey food and decided we liked the food better. No aspersions were intended. After all, we grew up in New Jersey and still worship at the altars of Seton Hall Prep, Bruce Springsteen, and the New York football Giants. Anyway, we might need

We were in western Tennessee last week for an argument.   We stayed at a beautiful and venerable hotel, most famous for twice-daily “march of the ducks.” Every morning, at 11 a.m. sharp (at least 30 minutes after guests have packed the lobby), an elevator door opens, and a uniformed “duck master” leads a perfect procession